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Michael Baumtrog

Michael Baumtrog

Assistant Professor
DepartmentLaw and Business
EducationPh.D, MA, BA (H)
OfficeYDI 1067
Phone416-979-5000, ext. 544868

Overview

Michael Baumtrog is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Law and Business at the Ted Rogers School of Management. He completed his PhD in philosophy at the New University of Lisbon (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Portugal in 2015, with a specialization in reasoning and ethics. His undergraduate and master’s degrees were completed at the University of Windsor. His current philosophical interest pertain the moral and epistemological status of children in both the social and working worlds, as well as the normative and descriptive construction of argumentation schemes (patterns of reasoning). He works to use both areas of study to make practical improvements in the real world.

Applied ethics, practical reasoning, critical thinking, social epistemology.

Select Research and Professional Contributions
2021 “Designing Critical Questions for Argumentation Schemes, external link, opens in new window.” Argumentation. 35 (4), pp. 629–643
2021 - “Youth voting, rational competency, and epistemic injustice.” Informal Logic, 41(1), pp. 41-55.
2019 - (with H. Martin, Z. Vahedi, and S. Ahadi). “Is There a Case for Gamification in Business Ethics Education? An Empirical Study”. Teaching Ethics: The Journal of the Society for Ethics Across the Curriculum, 19 (2), pp. 113-127
2019 - (with Harmony Peach) “They Can’t be Believed: Children, Intersectionality, and Epistemic Injustice.” Journal of Global Ethics, 15 (3), pp. 213-232.
2018 - (with João Sàágua) “Practical Rationality at Work - A New Argumentation Model.” In: J. Sàágua, & A. Marques (Eds.), Essays on Value and Practical Rationality - Ethical and Aesthetical Dimensions (pp. 193-230). Bern: Peter Lang.
2018 - “Navigating a Necessary Inequality: Children and Knowledge-Based Injustice, external link, opens in new window” in Social Inequality and the Spectre of Social Justice. C. Fanelli, G. Potter, J. Noonan & J. Essex (Eds.), Alternative Routes: A Journal of Critical Social Research Vol 29, pp. 294-306.  
2018 - “Editor’s Introduction, external link, opens in new window.” Reason and Rhetoric in the Time of Alternative Facts: Special Issue of Informal Logic, 28 (1).
2018 – “Reasoning and Arguing, Dialectically and Dialogically, Among Individual and Multiple Participants.” Argumentation, 32(1), pp.77-98.
2017 - "Others and Imagination in Reasoning and Argumentation: Improving our Critical Creative Capacity, external link, opens in new window.”  Informal Logic, 37(2), pp. 129-151.  
2016 – “The Willingness to be Rationally Persuaded, external link, opens in new window,” in P. Bondy and L. Benacquista (Eds). Argumentation, Objectivity, and Bias: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA), 18-21 May 2016. Windsor, Ontario.
Course code Course title
BUS 221 Business Decision-Making
BUS 223 Ethics in Commerce